Pele Giveth, Pele Taketh Away

As most of you know by now, the island of Hawaiʻi has been under siege by Pele, the ancient goddess of volcanoes. The surge in the volcanic eruption is causing so much disruption in the local communities. Leilani is almost gone. Everyone has been evacuated or are at least on notice if they happen to have a home closer to the highway. They need a permit card in order to enter and since I donʻt live in that subdivision I donʻt have photos, however I will attempt to update this path of destruction. Over 90 homes have been overtaken by lava. Many of the main highways, in and out of lower Puna, have been crossed by 20 ft. berms of lava and are no longer available. There are now over 20 fissures which are spewing lava and associated sulfuric oxide gasses so even if oneʻs house is still standing, itʻs unsafe to live in Leilani

 

 

 

or Lanipuna. The lava is slowly moving toward the Geothermal Energy Plant. Two the wells have been breeched. All of the wells are plugged, but since this is a scenario that has never before happened anywhere in the world, the mystery of whether or not the plugs will keep the gasses from escaping is still unknown. The lava has entered in the ocean in a couple of places so this is causing what is called Laze, a mixture of ash, lava and glass. The lava has crossed major highways. Pohoʻiki, ʻOpihikao, Kahena and Seaview are now pretty much cut off from the rest of the island with the only road out being Government Beach Rd., which until recently had been just a “Jeep” trail. We are getting hundreds of quakes a day, most are minor and I donʻt even feel many of them. Up the mountain is Kīlauea which is causing these problems. Halemaʻumaʻu is erupting ash which is now going 15,000 ft. into the air, filling the sky with a gray blanket of misery for those close by. The community centers of Keaʻau and Pāhoa are now shelters and the larger parks are now tent cities. Most restaurants, parks, etc. have opened their restrooms to non-customers and, of course, members of the community are stepping in to help. Meals are being prepared daily, everyone has water. The centers are pet-friendly and animal food is in supply. There are many, many volunteers. The Lava Shack, a local club where we line-dance monthly, held a can-goods drive and the place was packed. Other businesses are stepping up as well.

So far, the only problems Iʻve encountered are burning eyes and lethargy. Iʻm not sure why the latter is happening but I just feel tired. Iʻm still keeping up with my general activies, my on-line shop, etc. but I think just knowing I have so many friends displaced is taxing. Today is raining which doesnʻt help those in alternative housing, but I think it keeps some of the ash from coming this way. However, the gray skies and the rain are not conducive to a cheery mood, though I do have a dress rehearsal for our line-dancing performance in Honolulu next week and that should cheer me up.

Pray for our island.

Advertisements

A DAY IN THE PARK

Dancing, eating, socializing at Kuhio Kalaniana’ole Park in Keaukaha

Today about 20 members of our hula halau decided to hold a practice at the park. We’ve been planning on doing this monthly and today we finally got it together to do it…thank you Patti. She arrived with her super sound system that has Bluetooth capabilities so no need for electrical outlets.  It was like having all of our favorite singing artists right there in the park with us. This was a video showing the beautiful park, the bay and some of us getting ready to dance, but some reason it uploaded as a photo. Oh well, another glitch with me and Windows 10.  Since I was dancing, I didn’t get any of us actually dancing.

The weather was perfect. It’s been incredibly hot lately. My poor trees at home are suffering, my grass is brown and crunchy. I’m sewing in my little out-building which is usually about 95 to 96 degrees. I’m thankful for my little tower fan! However, the park was perfect. It’s right at the edge of Reed’s Bay in Hilo, there was a nice tradewind blowing through the beautiful Shower trees. There was just enough shade for some of us to dance in with a few line changes so we got a break from the sun. A pop up tent protecting the incredible array of pupus–everything from fried chicken to a vegetable platter with hummus, orange/walnut scones baked fresh that morning. The children of some of the girls had a great time swimming, riding scooters, playing catch. We DANCED! Some of the songs I’m still “following” as they were taught when I was on Maui for three years, but it gave me a chance to practice a couple. Some of the songs were old favorites–Ke Aloha, Ke Akua Mana E, Holei.  Some were new favorites–Pua Kiele, Wainiha,  He U’i, Kaimana Hila. Some days are just made for dancing.

This park held a lot of memories for me as when, in 1963, I was 18, my family sailed from San Diego to Hilo and it was at Reed’s Bay that we dropped anchor. But without any facilities, after a couple of weeks, we sailed on to Honolulu. Then when I returned to live in Hilo in 1975 my husband and I helped organize the Hilo Sailing Club for Hobie Cats. After our regattas we would come over to what is now this park. At the time we had to clear a lot of the California grass, pick up litter and make a little area to have a BBQ by the beach. There was an old abandoned store or hotel that had burned down, so we cleared quite a bit of cement chunks, but had a bit of a foundation for folding chairs and the hibachis. Much has changed, but much has not. It still has a local vibe. It still welcomes families. The bay is still refreshingly cool on a hot day.

We plan on doing this monthly at many of the different parks around the Hilo area. I can’t wait!